Against the grain - Rice Dream vs. Trader Joe's brand rice milk [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
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Rice Dream vs. Trader Joe's brand rice milk [Apr. 7th, 2009|08:01 am]
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food_allergies

[mrn613]
Does anyone with severe allergies know if there is a difference between these two products ingredient list, both listed and unlisted, or if they are actually the same product, rebranded? Specifically I have been told there is unlisted barley syrup in the rice dream. Does TJ's also contain barley?
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[User Picture]From: momma_meow
2009-04-07 01:12 pm (UTC)

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if there is unlisted barley syrup in the rice dream that would explain why it still makes me sick
[User Picture]From: gallian
2009-04-07 02:42 pm (UTC)

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yes, there is unlisted barley malt in the rice dream milk (all rice dream products, i believe.)

the TJs brand one is actually as written.

Rice Dream makes me sick. TJs Rice Milk is a reasonable substitute for my usual milk alternative when I can't get to WFM. (I prefer Living Harvest Hemp Milk, personally.)
[User Picture]From: mrn613
2009-04-07 03:46 pm (UTC)

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thanks all. I spoke to Hain and they said that indeed all rice dream flavors use a barley derived enzyme in production (not barley malt however), which is removed and discarded. although the product tests gluten free, they do not claim it to be barley free. they do not produce the TJ rice milk.
[User Picture]From: oakmouse
2009-04-07 04:30 pm (UTC)

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Hain's rice milk is not in fact gluten free, it tests to lower than 20 PPM of gluten. This is the Codex/European Union standard for GF labeling, and the FDA is considering adopting it as the American standard for GF labeling, but since celiac is an autoimmune disease which includes gluten reaction at a molecular level many celiacs still become quite ill from <20PPM of gluten. Hain/Celestial rice milk products used to be labeled as containing traces of barley, but they recently changed the label and since then many celiacs and barley allergics (including me) have become sick from their products. I've seen a lot of resentment in the celiac community over this issue.
[User Picture]From: mrn613
2009-04-07 05:26 pm (UTC)

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Thanks for information, that is good to know. My daughter did have diarrhea after drinking the rice dream original and not after the rice dream vanilla. It makes sense that the batch of original she drank might have more gluten in it than the batch of vanilla she has been drinking. I didn't understand what might have caused that since the original has fewer ingredients. May I ask what calcium rich beverage you drink? TJ rice milk? is TJ calcium enriched? Is the hemp milk the other poster mentioned calcium enriched?
[User Picture]From: oakmouse
2009-04-07 05:48 pm (UTC)

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The gluten levels in Rice Dream may well vary from batch to batch, and perhaps also by the details of the other ingredients.

As far as TJ's goes, although they're a good resource for people with gluten issues, I live in a small town in rural Oregon and the nearest TJ's is 300 miles away so I get there about once a year. The only product of theirs in my kitchen right now is the remains of a bottle of single malt scotch I bought on my last trip to California and have been savoring slowly as a special treat. ;)

I don't drink calcium-rich beverages; I don't really have that option. The only non-dairy milks I can buy locally are either Hain/Celestial brands like Soy Dream and Westsoy (which I don't trust and won't drink; if they lie about their rice milk they may lie about other products too) or are cross-contaminated with dairy (to which I'm violently allergic), or are far too expensive for my budget (hemp milk, almond milk). Instead I eat a lot of calcium-rich nondairy foods (kale, broccoli, sunflower seeds, etc) and take calcium supplements. I'm learning to make soymilk at home, but of course that doesn't have the same amount of calcium as an enriched soymilk from the grocery store.
[User Picture]From: mrn613
2009-04-07 06:15 pm (UTC)

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Hain does make one beverage that is completely free of barley. They made special runs of soy dream original unenriched for passover use which are certified barley free by the orthodox union. But they do not contain added calcium, so that won't help you. My daughter is soy allergic, so it doesn't help us either.
[User Picture]From: oakmouse
2009-04-07 06:53 pm (UTC)

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I didn't know about the special passover soymilk. Thank you very much for telling me! If it's U of O certified then it should be quite safe; they're sticklers. (I live and die by their kosher marks to identify dairy cross-contamination.) The Passover soymilk may not be useful as a calcium supplement, but I can stock up on some for cooking and baking until I get my soymilk-making skills up to speed. I like to use it in some baked goods, and my husband loves his soymilk pudding.
From: revmamacrystal
2009-04-07 03:54 pm (UTC)

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heard that rumor too. My daughter is allergic to barley but has no reaction to TJ rice milk. She does with Rice Dream, but we were never able to confirm why.
[User Picture]From: gallian
2009-04-08 02:01 am (UTC)

calcium info for Living Harvest Hemp Milk

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I don't know if the Hemp milk i mentioned is calcium "enriched" per se, but it does state "excellent source of calcium, vitamin d, b12, magnesium, quality protein source" on the front of the box.

for a 1 cup serving, it lists the calcium at 40% of the RDA.

hope that's helpful. Here is a link to the full nutritional info for the product i'm referencing:
http://www.worldpantry.com/cgi-bin/ncommerce3/ProductDisplay?prmenbr=655972&prrfnbr=950025
[User Picture]From: dulcedemon
2009-04-08 02:43 am (UTC)

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I don't know about Trader Joe's, but Rice Dream does contain unlisted barley syrup. They have not changed their recipe, and the gluten-free stamp on Rice Dream cartons is meaningless as far as I'm concerned.
Unless you can "play by European rules". Rice Dream is GF by European standards, but not Canadian. The USA has no uniform standard for GF as of yet. That's why Rice Dream can just drop the barely warning from their labels in the USA and get away with it. I had to ask the customer service about Rice Dream's GF status almost 10 times before I got a response.
Not all celiacs can get away with trace amounts. I know, because I sure can't. I drink a lot of milk substitutes(rice and hemp). That's why I don't understand how they can say trace amounts don't matter. By the end of the day, all those trace amounts add up to you being glutened.